Paying For What You Get

Follicular units are spread around the scalp. There is a higher concentration of smaller FU´s around the sides of the head, with the larger follicular units, 3 and 4 hair units situated around the occipital bone, or the back of the head

The definition of a graft is a piece of living tissue that is transplanted surgically. The term graft applies to the follicular unit in a hair transplant procedure. The term graft and follicular unit can imply the same

A hair transplant relies on the fact we can remove hair from the back and sides of the head and place them over the top of the scalp to give coverage and the illusion of high density to mimic nature

You can have 5000 FU´s but the number of hairs could be anything from 5000 if all single hair units to 20,000 hairs if all 4 hair follicular units. This can make a huge difference to the quality of the hair transplant

As the term graft technically only means a piece of tissue it is important to determine what the clinic refers to it as. Many clinics will say you have had “x” amount of grafts placed, and this can mean FU´s, but it important to understand the meaning prior to making your decision

There should be an approximate average hair count of 2.2 hair per FU/graft, if this is significantly lower it can impair the quality of the hair transplant and mean paying significantly more on average to the number of hairs.

When quoted for a hair transplant it is common you are told you pay per graft placed, confirm this means pay for every intact FU placed and ask for the hair to FU count

FUT harvests the grafts from a single, relatively thin hair bearing strip where the follicles are at the highest density. The strip is then divided to remove the individual follicular units, 1, 2, 3 and 4 hair units.

FUE extracts the follicular units one by one and over a wider surface area than FUT; the donor should be shaved and the safe zone assessed, checking for miniaturisation especially around the borders of the donor and recipient areas

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